low hanging fruit.

A new film worth seeing, Wasted looks at one of the great tragedies of our time – the fact that people go hungry while we throw away food.

Our wasteful tendencies have far reaching consequences, ranging from overfishing to climate change.  These are things we generally don’t associate with the uneaten food on our plates.

The narrative breaks down the food waste issue into a stepwise approach to mitigation.  To me, this is the best kind of environmental problem to have.  The solutions are manageable, and within our grasp.  They involve beautiful things, like gardens, and they invite a fresh look at our cuisine.  The solutions can be homegrown and delicious.  What more could we ask for?

Check the trailer here –

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trans-siberian

The Trans-Siberian is one of my dreams, though in the current political climate it’s probably best to put it on hold.  Truth is, I love all trains, local and long distance.  If I had one to recommend, I would suggest grabbing the Amtrak that runs up the coast from San Diego or Los Angeles and take it all the way to Seattle.

There is something about the relaxing pace of train travel, the uninterrupted enjoyment of the passing landscape, the ability to roam around the massive moving structure and the chance meetings with complete strangers that is ultimately captivating, the epitome of slow travel.

If you haven’t the time, the money or are still leery of trains, start by moving up and down the SoCal coast on the Coaster where the stops are frequent and the scenery mesmerizing, or taking the MetroLink commuter from the Inland Empire to the beach.  Surprisingly, after years of using Los Angeles as an example of how to build a city devoid of public transit, there is actually a pretty useful and functional lightrail system in place.  It’s great for exploring.  If I had to recommend a random stop, it might be Mariachi Plaza.

Enjoy this video of the Trans-Siberian Railroad trip.

volcanoes.

Gain a new perspective on earth science with a look at volcanoes through the eyes of Werner Herzog.  In typical style, his foray into this topic goes beyond plate tectonics and molten rock; it’s somehow more of a film about the human condition than anything else.  From tribal rituals to North Korean propaganda, this tour exposes how our dynamic planet shapes our lives.  Here’s the trailer.  It’s worth a view: