relentless resilience.

It’s 2018 and what the environmental movement needs now more than ever is resilience.

As we have seen from across the political spectrum, it’s time to learn a lesson from our opponents and stop playing the moral upper hand. It may make us feel like what we are doing is right, but it doesn’t win the battle.

Too often people who are inclined to care about the environment back down because they encounter opposition and resistance. Quite likely, it is something they didn’t see coming. For a person who has discovered a reason to be concerned about the environment, whether it be from a news story, an experience in nature, their education, or the horrific images that expose the reality of the human impact on the environment, it may come as a shock that not only do people not share their concern, but people may actually scorn them for showing that concern.  Attacking people who care about the world is dirty business, but it is very effective at eliminating those voices from the conversation. It’s effective and it is a strategy that is advocated by the opposition to the environmental movement. Those who are newly initiated to environmental concern are likely surprised when they collide with that brick wall of opposition. It often manifests itself as an attack. It is designed to beat you down.

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attribution science.

When a drunk driving accident happens we have no problem implicating alcohol, even though there are countless other elements of the situation that may have contributed.  We all agree though that drunkenness enhances the likelihood of the event.  So we punish drunk drivers.

The climate change ‘debate’ is still focused on the claim that individual weather events can’t  be linked to human activites, which, as it turns out, is false.  Scientists are making great progress in understanding the connection.  What follows from this is that eventually it may lead to accountability; industries being held to blame for death and loss of property.   No wonder there is a ‘war on science.’

Read how scientists are building a body of evidence to attribute individual weather events to climate change here.