bad news.

“Education, I fear, is learning to see one thing by going blind to another.”

~Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac

 

It’s hard to be an optimist when you work with environmental issues.  That’s the story line that I hear anyway.  It became the basis of such a common question in my environmental science courses – ‘how can you teach this course and not be completely depressed?’ students would ask – that I began to interject empowerment clauses throughout the semester to stop students from becoming despondent.  My final lecture is now a discourse on optimism and possibility and is probably the antithesis of anything you might expect by way of concluding a semester spent groveling in the wastewater of civilization.

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environmental science versus environmental studies, what’s the difference?

There are two separate majors that can prepare you for environmentally-oriented careers:  environmental science and environmental studies.  In the midst of all of the other confusion you are bound to feel as you try to determine what to do with your life, this is an unwelcome addition.  Let’s sort it out.

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should you read Silent Spring?

Rachel Carson wrote Silent Spring as she was battling cancer.  It would become a seminal book on humanity’s misguided propensity to undermine its own well-being through the widespread use of chemical poisons.  It would also become recognized as the starting point of the modern environmental movement.  It’s no small irony that I had never read it despite having introduced it to countless audiences of introductory environmental science students.

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